Erosion Control on the Refuge

By Reta Rutledge LUSH Cosmetics gave the Friends a grant that included money to hire a contractor, Kyle Thompson. Kyle led and trained 7 volunteers from Wilderness Volunteers to install 17 mesquite erosion control structures in three areas of the refuge. The structures slow the water during flood events in these eroded washes, cause sediment to drop instead of washing away and create fertile ground for new vegetation to grow. This keeps water on the land where it soaks into the soil. Thank you LUSH for supporting this important work.

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Wild Wednesday, 15 June 2022, Nolina

Throughout our grasslands, oak woodlands, and pinyon-juniper stands in Arizona, New Mexico, and northern Mexico grows Nolina microcarpa, commonly known as beargrass, sacahuista, or palmilla. “Beargrass” is an unfortunate name, as it is not a grass at all, nor is it related to the mountain plant called “beargrass” (Xerophyllum tenax). I prefer to call it simply nolina, a lovely name, though the Aztecderived name, sacahuista, is lovely too. It is impressively drought-tolerant, fire-resilient, and evergreen, so it makes a wonderful ornamental plant in our xeriscaped gardens.

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Wild Wednesday. 1 June 2022. Precocity

We are all familiar with the precocious nature of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, performing the violin beautifully at the age of three and composing pieces of his own at five. Precocity is the development of skills considered very advanced for a given age. It comes from the Latin for “early ripening.” While Mozart was a prodigy with exceptional early talents, humans in general are altricial, born helpless and needing a long period of parental care until able to function independently. Mozart was certainly no less helpless as a newborn, but his musical abilities developed at an extraordinarily early age, thus being considered precocial compared to others in his age-class.

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Among Friends. May 2022. Jay Walking.

Arizonans harbor myths about “our” jays. I often hear folks talking about the blue jays in their yards. Well, yes, they have jays, and they are basically blue, but the proper Blue Jay is an eastern US species that has only been recorded in SE Arizona a couple times. We have four species of “blue jays” in Arizona: the Steller’s, Mexican, Pinyon, and Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay. I’ll focus on the scrub-jay in this essay, but I’ll show examples of the others for comparison. It’s time to set the record straight, so let’s do some jay walking.

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Among Friends. May 2022. Yucca.

While cacti often epitomize “desert” in North America, it’s the yuccas that are widespread and notable representatives of semiarid areas throughout much of the continent from Guatemala to southern Alberta, Baja California to Florida and up the coast to Maryland. There are almost 50 species, at least 14 in Arizona. They are completely dependent upon yucca moths for pollination, but the story is more complex than most of us realize. Let’s take a closer at look at these fascinating plants.

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Wild Wednesday. 6 April 2022. Silktassel.

Shrubs often fail to gather the respect they deserve. They lack the overbearing massiveness of a towering tree or the colorful brilliance of a showy wildflower. However, shrubs completely dominate the chaparral ecosystems in the West, and they create wonderful diversity in the understory of woodlands of oaks, pines, pinyons, and junipers. One of my favorites is Wright’s Silktassel, Garrya wrightii, found throughout Arizona from about 3000-8000 feet, the southern half of New Mexico, the western tip of Texas, and down to central Mexico. Let’s see what makes this shrub so likeable.

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